• Taimur Chambers Plot # 10-D (WEST), Fazal-ul-Haq Rd, Islamabad
  • (+92) 51-2278134, (+92) 51-2278135
  • Taimur Chambers Plot # 10-D (WEST), Fazal-ul-Haq Rd, Islamabad
  • (+92) 51-2278134, (+92) 51-2278135

Center for Future Policy and Strategic Studies (CPFSS)

Change is a permanent phenomenon in the global power structure. While going down in the recorded history, we see the rise and fall of world powers and empires, e.g. Greek, Roman, Muslim, and British. The most recent example of it is the US that is gradually losing its dominance in the world politics. Interestingly, with the change of global power structure, international norms and values are being redefined to suit the interests of new power players and structures. In the start of 20th century, the power dynamics started to change and World War-I & II further changed the whole power structure. Consequently, the US emerged as a new global player along with the USSR. After the disintegration of the USSR in the late 1980s till the 1990s, the US appeared as a sole superpower.

However, the incident of 9/11 and emergence of new economies after 2000 heralded a change in the dynamics of global power system. The emergence of rapidly growing economies like China posed a serious question to the prevailing US hegemony and global governance system. Now, the emerging economies are constantly gaining visibility in international scenario. Moreover, war on terror and the situation emerged after the 9/11 attacks further exhausted the resources of the US and western countries. A change in the historic trend of dominance is soon dissipating, and it seems that the present system will be changed by a set of new players. Recent global incidents, e.g. Libyan and Syria crises, as well as a deal between Iran and major powers, have further strengthened this notion. Moreover, non-traditional security threats, e.g. cyber, organized crimes, climate change, etc. are also on the anvil. Prevailing situation and changing dynamics of global power structure has a direct and paramount relevance in the new world order.

This scenario opens new avenues for research, ways of thinking and developing relations, and framing foreign policies. Seemingly, the present schools of thought are not fully equipped with the instruments to comprehend this emerging trend and its future needs. Therefore, there is a need to extensively explore the available domain of knowledge and developing new fields of interactions to secure the interests.

Developing countries and regions almost lack institutions, which can work for changing the future scenario. In the backdrop of this whole international scenario, SDPI has planned to open a new center ‘Center for Future Policy and Strategic Studies (CPFSS)’ to provide independent policy advice based on the quality research. Working on an issue that is often polarized and politicized, the CFSS will provide a Platform for objective research and analysis to develop pragmatic policies and solutions.

Other Publications
Why trade with India is in our interest

For more details: Shakeel Ahmed Ramay at sramay@sdpi.org, shakeelramay@gmail.com