E-Cigarettes in Pakistan

E-Cigarettes in Pakistan

Publication details

  • Friday | 13 Nov, 2020
  • Waseem Iftikhar Janjua, Syed Ali Wasif Naqvi
  • Research Reports,Project Publications
Download File

Overview Though introduced in the year 2006 in the USA,1 the product was first launched two years before in China.2 With a total market volume of US$6.245 billion in 2020, most of the revenue for the E-Cigarettes is generated in the United States whereas Pakistan’s share is a whopping $61.3 million.3 Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS) is the umbrella term used for the electronic smoking products and includes e-cigarettes, vapes, vape pens, etc.4 ENDS are the devices that heat the liquid containing nicotine to create an inhalable aerosol. The products vary in shape, size, function, and price, ranging between low-cost disposable devices to large refillable tanks. E-Cigarettes also vary with regard to nicotine dosage, flavours, emissions, design, battery voltage, and unit circuitry5, 6. Additionally, the open systems in E-Cigarettes contain a refillable tank whereas the closed systems are either disposable or a prefilled cartridges can be added to such devices.7 Juul, Vype and Blu are some of the examples. Similarly, as per WHO 8, the Heated Tobacco Products (HTPs) or Heat-no-Burn (HnB) products use a device to heat the tobacco and other chemicals to produce the aerosol. They have been available in the market since 1980. These are the specially designed cigarette-pods or plugs such as ‘heat sticks’ or ‘neo sticks’, which are designed to heat the tobacco to 250 to 300 degrees Celsius compared to the conventional cigarette burning at 900 degrees and producing many toxicants.9 E-Cigarettes and HTPs are often described as ‘novel products’, ‘alternative products’, ‘emerging products’, or ‘next-generation products’10. The emergence of hybrid tobacco products blurs the difference between the HTPs and E-Cigarettes, making its regulation and control further challenging especially in the Low-to-Middle-Income Countries (LMICs). As argued by WHO 11, these products are also classified as Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS) and Electronic Non-Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENNDS).