Implementation of Convention on Biological Diversity in Pakistan (PB-2)

Implementation of Convention on Biological Diversity in Pakistan (PB-2)

Publication details

  • Thursday | 01 Oct, 1998
  • Tahir Hasnain
  • Policy Briefs/Papers
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Tahir Hasnain, SDPI 1998 Pakistan, covering a land area of 803,940 sq. km, is rich in biodiversity. It has been divided into 10 major ecological zones and contains species upto 5,700 of plants, 188 of mammals, 666 of birds, 174 of reptiles, 125 of freshwater and 400 of marine fish, and insects/invertebrates of 20,000. The pressures on biodiversity are reported to be: rapid growth in human population; increasing numbers of livestock; commercial forestry practices; increasing use of fertilizers and pesticides; expanding agriculture; increasing numbers of industries polluting land, water and air; expanding settlements encroaching on wildlife habitats; commercial fishing practices adversely affecting aquatic habitats; water-supply and energy-generating developments; transportation, tourism and harbour developments; and hunting at levels of exploitation. Pakistan is signatory to the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) since 1992, with the Cabinet having ratified it in 1994. To implement the Convention, federal and provincial authorities have made significant attempts for the protection of biodiversity and natural capital of the country. The article-wise synthesis of the progress made by Pakistan on the implementation of the Convention is given below.