Promoting Regional Cooperation in South Asia through Integrated Forms of Governance (W - 137)

Promoting Regional Cooperation in South Asia through Integrated Forms of Governance (W - 137)

Publication details

  • Tuesday | 29 Oct, 2013
  • Adnan Talib
  • Working Papers
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Adnan Talib Hakimjee 
 
Abstract
 
The paper presents a case for integrated forms of regional governance in South Asia, and a model applicable across several different areas of cooperation. The first section of the paperargues that globalization has led to increased interdependency between and within states and non-state actors, particularly multinational corporations and civil society organizations. Across the world, national, regional and global governance regimes have evolved as states in response to the immense challenges presented by globalization, though in differentiated patterns. Globalization has facilitated the growth of civil society networks and the rise of private authority in global governance. Governance structures are being reformed to facilitate greater coordination of efforts between government institutions, the private sector and the civil society, across all levels of governance.   
 
The second section argues that greater coordination among three main actors on the national and regional level can be achieved through marketization of public services and the establishment of multi-stakeholder networks. The third section presents an integrated governance model for South Asia, and elaborates upon its applicability across different sectors. The fourth section expands upon the role of governments, civil society and the private sector in promoting an agenda for integrated governance in South Asia. It also discusses the policy implications of multi-stakeholder approaches across three areas: policy development, policy implementation, and policy learning or evaluation. The fifth and final section sheds light on the likely challenges in promoting and sustaining an integrated regional
governance model. In sum, the paper argues that integrated governance model would enrich policy processes at the regional level, and would fulfil gaps in governance, representation and accountability. It would certainly help promote regional cooperation; nevertheless, it warrants important political and structural consideration.