University Faculty's Share in Goods and Services in Pakistan (W-32)

University Faculty's Share in Goods and Services in Pakistan (W-32)

Publication details

  • Friday | 15 May, 1998
  • Tariq Rahman
  • Working Papers
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Tariq Rahman, SDPI 1998 Introduction This study compares the renumeration of academics with bureaucrats and military officers in Pakistan.  In this pilot study only the academics at the Quaid-i-Azam University (Islamabad) have been compared with bureaucrats and military officers in Rawalpindi-Islamabad.  A comparison on similar lines was carried out earlier by the government (Annex A).  It was issued in July 1997 but the renumeration of employees worked out in it is lower for senior officers than the one worked out in this paper (Annex B). A study of the `aggregate emoluments of the Federal Government Employees over the period 1977-78 to 1991- 92' was also carried out by Faiz Bilquees (1994).  In conclusion Bilquees concluded that the emoluments should be increased.  However, she did not take some of the perquisites of the officers into account nor did she compare them with the emoluments of military officers and academics. In this study the calculation is not necessarily cost to the state but how much the individual would have paid for enjoying the goods and services -- called `tangible gratifications' here -- had he/she obtained them on payment.  Tangible gratifications include, besides the salary and allowances, such things as accommodation, telephone, transport, medical facilities, domestic help, driver and so on.  These have been monetized i.e a price tag has been fixed upon them.  Generally, the price tag is what the good or service in question costs to the public.  In some cases, however, other criteria have been used.  All calculations are approximations and are subject to revision and correction. Only tangible means of gratification -- salary, allowances, accommodation, phone, car and medical care -- have been taken into account.  Intangible ones -- exercise of power, prestige, pleasure in work, autonomy and nature of work -- have not been monetized or measured.  Their importance, however, cannot be denied and quantifying them is a challenge for further work in this area.