Population, Environment and De-Responsibilisation: Case Studies from the Rural Areas of Pakistan (M-7)

Population, Environment and De-Responsibilisation: Case Studies from the Rural Areas of Pakistan (M-7)

Publication details

  • Monday | 09 Mar, 1992
  • Tariq Banuri
  • Monographs
  • 19
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Introduction

Population growth is considered by many scientists and intellectuals as the main problem facing the world today. The stress that a growing population would place on civilisation was already predicted by Malthus in the nineteenth century. Yet, scientific and technological advances and the accumulation of human-made capital have since then proven sufficient to support a much larger population with even more goods and services. In recent years, the debate has been revived, with neo- Malthusian writers warning that the world population would soon out-grow the resources (Ehrlich 1968), and that in any case resources were already over-used (Meadows, et al 1972). In the tradition of neo-classical economics, it was responded that science and technology had proved capable of coping with the previous scarcity constraints, and that natural resources were not as scarce as some wanted to believe—as shown by the declining prices of most commodities (Simon 1981).